The Mage’s Tale Review

By Daniel Starkey

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Virtual reality is in a bit of a tough spot. While the medium has enjoyed a lot of mainstream visibility of late, few VR games have actually found broad success. The Mage’s Tale is meant to be Oculus’ new tentpole–a robust virtual-reality adventure that will sell us all on the magic of the technology and the ever-elusive sense of “presence.” Unfortunately, The Mage’s Tale is a fractured adventure packed with minor technical oddities, poor voice work, and shallow dungeon crawling.

The tale opens with the kidnapping of your master at the hands of an evil sorcerer, and you, the lowly apprentice, must embark on a rescue mission. It’s every bit as hackneyed as it sounds. Making the opening even less appealing, the mage’s familiar–an obnoxious magical creature that’s along for the ride–immediately berates you for your incompetence. Unfortunately, he’s your teacher, carrying you down the path of learning the skills and spells you’ll need to exact vengeance.

That’s the core appeal here, too: crafting spells and using them within a virtual space. That portion, at least, works well. The Oculus Touch controllers temporarily create the sensation that you’re in control of magic, momentarily fulfilling dream of being whisked away to star in your own mythical adventure. Thanks to solid motion controls in VR, actions are intuitive: you grab potions and knock away obstacles with your hands, you look around as you would in the real world, and there’s even a nifty menu system based on the positions of your hands that sells the illusion that you’re a real wizarding student.

As you explore dungeons, you find various items to boost or augment your spells (one mod causes your fireballs to bounce around the room) to add some variety. It’s meant to create the sense that you’re learning magic and genuinely exploring and crafting new ideas or techniques on your own instead of simply following the rote, by-the-book rules you’ve learned up to that point. Some mods, like one that lets you guide spells remotely, change some functionality. But even then, their application doesn’t meaningfully alter gameplay. A fireball is a fireball, essentially. It doesn’t help that many are cosmetic too, adding little more than confetti and flair to your casting. By the end of an 11-hour run, the rudimentary spell variety more than takes its toll.

Even worse, movement during combat is a drag. Dodging is one-note–you’ll be bouncing between two or three positions as you evade incoming spells and arrows from fantastical goblins and the like–and each time you do, you suddenly appear in a new spot. Immediately. This avoids the common VR problem with motion sickness–due to artificial locomotion via a joystick–but only for a time. Whenever combat really gets going (which, in this case, could be two or three enemies in the room all attacking at once), you’re like a walking glitch, stuttering through the world. It trades the immediate discomfort of gradual movement for the more disorientating and equally …read more

Source:: www.gamespot.com

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